Monday, 08 May 2017 22:03

Common Mistakes That May be Costing You an Interview

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Common Mistakes That May be Costing You an InterviewFind out how to fix your job application to get more opportunities.

How well do you present information? Have you built your personal brand in your resume? Your resume will be the first thing judged after you hand in your application. Employers and recruiters alike will take notice of small mistakes you may have made, making it difficult for you to pass important first hurdles.

Here are some mistakes that might be costing you an interview:

File incorrectly named. Was your file properly named? Avoid using generic file names such as “Resume NEW” or “Resume 2017.” Make sure your file name includes your full name. Don’t take the chance of your resume getting lost just because you forgot to name it properly.

In cases where employers allow you to upload multiple resumes, you can still include your full name and add a reference such as “business management” or “project development.” The same rule applies to your cover letter as well.

No professional email address. Make sure you have a separate email address for your professional engagements. You can simply use your first and last name for your email address, and this is the safest choice. You don’t want to use an email address that is cute, confusing, or that could be inappropriate.

Email display name is different than that in the resume. Does your email display name match the one in your resume? It’s a no-no to have a mismatch. It can cause issues in candidate databases that will hurt your chances of getting in. Use your full legal name and make sure it reads the same in all places.

Not proofreading the resume. Before submitting your resume, have you thoroughly checked for careless mistakes? Look for all grammatical errors or misspelled words. Don’t forget to check if you’ve used the right punctuation marks. Print out the whole document and use a pen to mark it up for the final check. You may need to ask a friend or family member for help. A second set of eyes can catch errors you may have missed.

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