Alan Carniol

Alan Carniol

Alan is the creator of Interview Success Formula, a training program that has helped more than 80,000 job seekers to ace their interviews and land the jobs they deserve. Interviewers love asking curveball questions to weed out job seekers. But the truth is, most of these questions are asking about a few key areas. Learn more about how to outsmart tough interviewers by watching this video.

Most applicants come to Having an Employers Mindsetan interview with the wrong mindset. Often, this is why they don’t get hired even when they have the necessary skills and experience. The problem is that they have the applicant’s mindset.

When you come to an interview you should be there with an employer’s mindset. Why? Because this will help you understand what goes through their mind when they interview an applicant. Using this knowledge, you can prepare for an interview with the right mindset.

resume mistakesA lot of times we want to know what to do to get a job. Right now, however, let’s talk about what we do to NOT get a job.

Most often, we  focus on the major points in preparing our resume; for this reason, we neglect the minor things that people do to get their resume sent straight to the shredder.

Teacher Job InterviewAfter waiting for what seems like forever, you finally get a call from the school administrator. Now what?

An interview is a lot like a test. If you prepare thoroughly for your interview, you won’t need to worry about passing the test.

During an inBiggest Weakness Answerterview, when you feel like you’ve done everything right to impress the interviewer and show that you’re the best candidate for the job, the last thing you want to hear the interviewer say is the dreaded, “What’s your biggest weakness?” The problem is, this question will almost always get asked, no matter how you might hate it.

There might not be a “perfect” answer that you can recite to get this right. Don’t fret—there are things you can do to answer interview questions properly.

Older applicants TipsMany people who are older than the average applicant fear interviews. However, seasoned applicants need not allow their age to become an issue. Older applicants should understand that they have something that average applicants don’t.

As an older applicant, you have experience. Prepare answers to interview question in which you can use this experience during an interview to prove that you will be the better employee.

Monday, 25 June 2012 02:54

Saying Thanks after Rejection

Job Interview RejectionYou submit your resume, get called for an interview, dress properly, arrive early, answer every question with ease, and basically breeze through the interview process seamlessly. Everything seems to be going right for you. You assume that the only thing left is the job offer, so you're already thinking of salary, benefits, and when you can start.

Suddenly, you get a call telling you that they decided to hire someone else, and then it all dawns on you. All of your expectations are now down the drain. Even though you knew that the job was yours, they went ahead and chose someone else. Now what? Send them a thank-you letter.

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 You sent your resume to countless companies. After weeks of waiting, you finally get a call. Now, it’s up to you to dazzle the interviewer and get hired.

It’s no secret that preparation is crucial to acing an interview. Yet it’s funny how people neglect preparation and wonder why they don’t get hired.

Getting an interview is the easy part. Impressing and making an interviewer believe you’re the best person for the job is the hard part. But don’t fret—you can make the hard part easy. How? The answer is properly preparing for an interview.

Preparing for an interview takes time. You need to put in the time and effort to make sure everything goes  right for you on your big day.

drinking-beer-interviewWhen you think about how to deliver strong answers to questions in an interview, beer doesn’t usually come to mind (well, having one maybe, but...). So for a bit of respite from the standard sources of interview advice, I turned to one of my favorite sources for inspiration.

Here’s what I realized is true for both a job applicant walking into an interview and for a beer:

job-interview-answers-2Having strong answers for interview questions depends on a number of factors. One of the key factors that is sometimes overlooked is authenticity. Do your responses give the interviewer a good sense of who you are and what you are about?

Job seekers sometimes forget about this concept of authenticity. Instead, they provide overplayed and generic answers that they think the interviewer wants to hear. These are answers like, "I’m a hard worker," "I’m a team player,” or "I have great attention to detail."

Such cookie-cutter answers are better than saying nothing, but every interviewer has heard these responses a number of times. Consequently, the interviewer doesn’t learn much about what makes this job applicant different from the next one. The interviewer also doesn’t know whether the interviewer is a hard worker or is just saying something that seems like a good interview answer. As a result, the interviewer is likely to dismiss this applicant.

So, what do you do if you really are a hard worker? You have a couple of options.

First, you can give examples to prove it. For example: "I work harder than other people. In college, I always took six classes, and never settled for a grade less than an A-" or "Being an architecture student, the norm was to do one or two all-nighters per week. I know how to work hard."

Alternatively, you can use less overplayed language that explains what makes you a hard worker. For instance: "I am someone who will dive headfirst into difficult problems and who only stops working when the problem has been solved." Or, as another example: "At this point in my life, my work comes first. I will put in whatever hours are needed to get the job done."

As you prepare answers for various job interview questions, think about how your responses can be less cookie-cutter. Focus on examples from your past that demonstrate your abilities, and come up with language that you feel comfortable with, that authentically represents you.