Friday, 31 August 2012 00:29

Should I Accept a Counter-Offer?

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Job Counter-OfferWhen you started looking for a new job, you wanted to leave due of a lot of factors. After several weeks of sending your resume to countless companies and going to interviews, you finally get a job offer that is exactly what you are looking for. You spoke with your current employer to let them know that you are leaving. However, your boss gave you a counter-offer that you can’t resist. Should you accept it, or not? Here are some reasons why you should not take the counter-offer.

  • Business is great, and profits are coming in like crazy. When you told your boss about changing jobs, they became worried about their business. They don’t want to ruin the momentum because an important employee is about to leave, so they jumped the gun on a raise and added benefits. However, when their problem is solved because you stayed, your relationship with your employer is forever damaged and you can expect to be at the top of the list when they need to start cutting expenses.
  • When the initial problem ceases because you accepted the counter-offer, it might be used against you. Your employer might only have given you a counter-offer to buy time: They only want you to stay until they find a replacement. In this case, you closed a door to a potential employer, and you could find yourself out of a job when they find a replacement.
  • You don’t mind burning a bridge, so you accepted the counter-offer because you were given a pay raise. However, as soon as the excitement of that raise wears off, you may start looking for a job again because money was not really your motivation when you started your search.
  • You were able to get the raise you asked for, but at what cost? You will pay the price with a damaged working relationship. When the time comes sooner or later for you to ask for a raise again, the counter-offer may be used against you.

Sometimes a counter-offer may be tempting, especially when the offer is better than what you were offered on the new job. Remember, however, that there are disadvantages to this. Yes, there are exceptions, and accepting a counter-offer might benefit you, but always keep in mind that it could also end up becoming the worst decision you ever made.

Read 4028 times Last modified on Wednesday, 16 January 2013 01:20
Alan Carniol

Alan is the creator of Interview Success Formula, a training program that has helped more than 40,000 job seekers to ace their interviews and land the jobs they deserve. Interviewers love asking curveball questions to weed out job seekers. But the truth is, most of these questions are asking about a few key areas. Learn more about how to outsmart tough interviewers by watching this video.